New Counselor Starts in March

Curriculum vitaeStrategies for Success is excited to welcome Regina Robison to the practice starting March 23, 2015. Regina’s strengths as a clinician include being compassionate, non-judgmental, and utilizes a strengths-based approach to care. She believes it is important to look at each individual as a whole, taking into account each person’s spiritual, cultural, and environmental influences to assist clients in overcoming problems and achieve balance and happiness in their lives. Regina also believes that it is essential for people to work through past trauma in order to release residual blame and shame and break free of old patterns that can keep them stuck in maladaptive thinking and behavioral patterns in their current life stage.

Regina’s clinical experience includes over 10 years working with children, adolescents, adults, elderly and clients with disabilities. She also has experience working with individuals and couples, providing treatment for mental health issues and substance abuse concerns as well as with conduct disorder, depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, grief and loss, and relationship conflicts, to name a few. Regina has also led multiple groups on topics that include self-esteem building, anger management, social skill building, substance abuse and conflict resolution, and is excited about the possibility of leading some groups at Strategies for Success.  She has worked from a Multisystemic approach successfully,  with seriously delinquent adolescents, and is very well versed with adolescent and family concerns.
In 2008, Regina received her Master of Arts Degree in Professional Counseling from Ottawa University in Phoenix, and her Bachelors of Arts in Psychology from Arizona State University in 2004, Magna Cum Laude.  She currently holds independent Licensure with the Arizona Board of Behavioral Health, as a Licensed Professional Counselor.
Regina utilizes various therapeutic approaches to assist clients in achieving their goals including cognitive behavioral therapy, brief solution-focused therapy, existential therapy, insight-oriented modalities and narrative therapy. Regina is a firm believer  in the healing power of the client-therapist relationship. Each treatment plan is created and implemented collaboratively with each client, tailored to maximize positive outcomes and lasting results. To email Regina, please do so at regina.robison@saptherapist.com. To schedule with Regina starting at the end of March in our Chandler location, please call our Main Number: (480) 252-5152 or email us at appointment@saptherapist.com.

Understanding The Nurtured Heart Approach

Heart made from handsBy Janine Stanley, Licensed Professional Counselor

I have been asked several times to explain this “Nurtured Heart Approach” by many friends, co-workers, parents and clients.  I often struggle to find my own words at times because it is represented in a visual image for me.  Imagine having the land to build your home, you have to start with building a foundation.  This in itself is a process, but you trust the contractors to follow your plan.   Some thoughts of all the things that could go wrong have already started but, you soon realize that you have created the time to attend all the meetings with the contractor; building a relationship and have set your expectations for this plan with creating boundaries on your blue print.  You then allow these “fear” based thoughts or negative thoughts to disappear creating a more positive outlook on what is being build.

Creating a new way to be in relationship with your child is much like I described above, you have to be willing to allow the negative to not have all the “power” in the relationship, you need to create more opportunities for the positive to shine in, and lastly you need to set the clear expectations which allow for the relationship to grow.

Once the foundation is poured only then can you allow the framing to begin.

According to difficultchild.com, “The Nurtured Heart Approach® is a set of core methodologies originally developed for working with the most difficult children. It has become a powerful way of bringing inner wealth to all children while facilitating parenting and classroom success. It has a proven, transformative impact on every child, including those with behavioral diagnosis such as ADHD, Autism, Asperger’s Syndrome, Oppositional Defiant Disorder, and Reactive Attachment Disorder – almost always without the need for medications or long-term treatment.” 

Howard Glasser is the founder of the Children’s Success Foundation and creator of the Nurtured Heart Approach® which has been used in hundreds of thousands of homes and classrooms around the world.”

CORE METHODOLOGIES: THE THREE STANDS

  • Neutralize Negative Behavior (“Don’t energize the bunny- take the batteries out”)
  • Energize Positive Behavior in Meaningful Ways (“Create the relationship that honors you and your child and allow for time-in)
  • Demonstrate Fair and Consistent Boundaries (“Create limits for transformation”)

Some of the many BENEFITS OF NURTURED HEART APPROACH

  1. Understand the uniqueness of the challenging child in the here & now
  2. Teaching a child to “Shift” or “flip” his/her intensity in successful ways
  3. Create a deeper sense relationship by allowing by building success & inner wealth for the child
  4. Identifying behavior that is working by feeding the soul with greatness this is not complimenting and feeding empty words
  5. Teaching a child to be Fearless in standing in their own Greatness

My good friend Sherry Blair, another Nurtured Heart Trainer and author wrote the following practice exercise, try it!

Nurtured Heart Greatness Practice: Stop now and notice yourself. What in this moment do you notice just by answering the above statements? Go ahead and notice TGT (Three Greatness Things). Create a sentence as if you were describing it to a blind person or as if you took a picture of yourself.

Now let’s notch that up. We are going to add some values and character strengths to the three statements above. For each statement above, answer the question “What does this show about me?” or “What value or strength am I showing?” For example, “I notice I completed this exercise. That shows my ability to focus and concentrate.”

http://positivitypulse.com/category/nurtured-heart-approach/

I love how she states “create a sentence as if you were describing it to a blind person…”  This allows me to stop and think which words would I choose?  Does a blind person understand color?  I have to dig deeper than describing myself on the surface, this is something most of us struggle to do, to stop and recognize most things around us on a deeper level.  Almost too afraid to stand in our own greatness and allow others to truly “see” us from the inside.  The word “positive” has some mixed feelings for some of us and sometimes it appears to be overused.  Again, I would challenge you to see that creating positivity is about creating relationship that is not at the surface level.

If I take us back to the image I created with you in the beginning the house please remember, once the foundation is completed, you allow the framing to begin. I will share with you these next steps as we continue to build the home of your dreams!

For more information n NHA: http://www.childrenssuccessfoundation.com

Be Here Now

by Suzanne Northey, M.S. LMFT at Strategies for Success, Chandler location

Are you looking for a way to increase your joy?

Do you want to learn to have greater appreciation for the people in your life?

Do you feel stuck in certain circumstances and can’t seem to find a way to move forward?

motivational reminder in letterpress type

Consider this. Maybe the reason for this is that you spend too much of your time living in the past or worried about your future. When you do either of these things, you rob yourself of a lot of happiness.

Why is this true? Because most people, when they think of the past, are focused on memories of when life was better or easier, or they ruminate on an unpleasant situation that does not serve them well in the present. For example, in intimate relationships in which there are difficulties, couples frequently rehash events where they felt wronged by their partner, and this just serves to perpetuate ill feelings.  Yes, there is one benefit to exploring past behaviors and that is to learn from those experiences so as to make healthier choices in the present. Beyond that, constant reminders of past hurt just keep negative dynamics alive.

Another why to block joy is to fixate on the future. Wondering about the “what if’s” can be upsetting and create undue stress. The only way a person can impact the future is by making smart and thoughtful decisions in the present. Worrying about it often causes feelings of helplessness and even fear.

Given this, why not make it your intention to “be here now”, to find solutions in the present and to implement plans that result in a more satisfying and fulfilling future. Shifting your thinking may not be easy, especially if it has been a way of being for a long time, but there is no doubt it is worth the effort.

Here’s to creating a happy life.

Improving Self-Esteem and Self-Confidence, Part 2

by Jennifer Menichello, LPC at Strategies for Success in Chandler, AZ

self esteem road sign illustration design

Last month, I suggested some things you can try on your own or with the help of your therapist to help you feel better about yourself.  Here are some more tips to increase your self-esteem/self-confidence:

– Take an inventory of all of the positive things you have accomplished throughout your life; things you are especially proud of.  At the end of each day, add something positive you have done that day to your list, and review it often.

– Think of a few specific goals….things you would like to accomplish in the future (near or far).  Close your eyes and visualize yourself successfully meeting these goals.

– Learn to recognize your negative thoughts.  Remember that you aren’t a fool…..you may have just done something foolish! Recognize and fix your mistakes when you can, but don’t internalize them.

– Avoid all-or-nothing thinking, such as “I always screw up!” or, “I’m never on time!”  Maybe you got to work on time 4 out of 5 days, and were only late once.  Try to think of times where you have shown up on time.  No one does something wrong 100% of the time.

– Try to keep your sense of humor!

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