New Counselor Starts in March

Curriculum vitaeStrategies for Success is excited to welcome Regina Robison to the practice starting March 23, 2015. Regina’s strengths as a clinician include being compassionate, non-judgmental, and utilizes a strengths-based approach to care. She believes it is important to look at each individual as a whole, taking into account each person’s spiritual, cultural, and environmental influences to assist clients in overcoming problems and achieve balance and happiness in their lives. Regina also believes that it is essential for people to work through past trauma in order to release residual blame and shame and break free of old patterns that can keep them stuck in maladaptive thinking and behavioral patterns in their current life stage.

Regina’s clinical experience includes over 10 years working with children, adolescents, adults, elderly and clients with disabilities. She also has experience working with individuals and couples, providing treatment for mental health issues and substance abuse concerns as well as with conduct disorder, depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, grief and loss, and relationship conflicts, to name a few. Regina has also led multiple groups on topics that include self-esteem building, anger management, social skill building, substance abuse and conflict resolution, and is excited about the possibility of leading some groups at Strategies for Success.  She has worked from a Multisystemic approach successfully,  with seriously delinquent adolescents, and is very well versed with adolescent and family concerns.
In 2008, Regina received her Master of Arts Degree in Professional Counseling from Ottawa University in Phoenix, and her Bachelors of Arts in Psychology from Arizona State University in 2004, Magna Cum Laude.  She currently holds independent Licensure with the Arizona Board of Behavioral Health, as a Licensed Professional Counselor.
Regina utilizes various therapeutic approaches to assist clients in achieving their goals including cognitive behavioral therapy, brief solution-focused therapy, existential therapy, insight-oriented modalities and narrative therapy. Regina is a firm believer  in the healing power of the client-therapist relationship. Each treatment plan is created and implemented collaboratively with each client, tailored to maximize positive outcomes and lasting results. To email Regina, please do so at regina.robison@saptherapist.com. To schedule with Regina starting at the end of March in our Chandler location, please call our Main Number: (480) 252-5152 or email us at appointment@saptherapist.com.

Be Here Now

by Suzanne Northey, M.S. LMFT at Strategies for Success, Chandler location

Are you looking for a way to increase your joy?

Do you want to learn to have greater appreciation for the people in your life?

Do you feel stuck in certain circumstances and can’t seem to find a way to move forward?

motivational reminder in letterpress type

Consider this. Maybe the reason for this is that you spend too much of your time living in the past or worried about your future. When you do either of these things, you rob yourself of a lot of happiness.

Why is this true? Because most people, when they think of the past, are focused on memories of when life was better or easier, or they ruminate on an unpleasant situation that does not serve them well in the present. For example, in intimate relationships in which there are difficulties, couples frequently rehash events where they felt wronged by their partner, and this just serves to perpetuate ill feelings.  Yes, there is one benefit to exploring past behaviors and that is to learn from those experiences so as to make healthier choices in the present. Beyond that, constant reminders of past hurt just keep negative dynamics alive.

Another why to block joy is to fixate on the future. Wondering about the “what if’s” can be upsetting and create undue stress. The only way a person can impact the future is by making smart and thoughtful decisions in the present. Worrying about it often causes feelings of helplessness and even fear.

Given this, why not make it your intention to “be here now”, to find solutions in the present and to implement plans that result in a more satisfying and fulfilling future. Shifting your thinking may not be easy, especially if it has been a way of being for a long time, but there is no doubt it is worth the effort.

Here’s to creating a happy life.

Mentally Strong People: The 13 Things They Avoid

Smart businessmanby Amy Morin

Article from www.forbes.com

For all the time executives spend concerned about physical strength and health, when it comes down to it, mental strength can mean even more. Particularly for entrepreneurs, numerous articles talk about critical characteristics of mental strength—tenacity, “grit,” optimism, and an unfailing ability as Forbes contributor David Williams says, to “fail up.”

However, we can also define mental strength by identifying the things mentally strong individuals don’t do. Over the weekend, I was impressed by this list compiled by Amy Morin, a psychotherapist and licensed clinical social worker,  that she shared in LifeHack. It impressed me enough I’d also like to share her list here along with my thoughts on how each of these items is particularly applicable to entrepreneurs.

1.    Waste Time Feeling Sorry for Themselves. You don’t see mentally strong people feeling sorry for their circumstances or dwelling on the way they’ve been mistreated. They have learned to take responsibility for their actions and outcomes, and they have an inherent understanding of the fact that frequently life is not fair. They are able to emerge from trying circumstances with self-awareness and gratitude for the lessons learned. When a situation turns out badly, they respond with phrases such as “Oh, well.” Or perhaps simply, “Next!”

2. Give Away Their Power. Mentally strong people avoid giving others the power to make them feel inferior or bad. They understand they are in control of their actions and emotions. They know their strength is in their ability to manage the way they respond.

3.    Shy Away from Change. Mentally strong people embrace change and they welcome challenge. Their biggest “fear,” if they have one, is not of the unknown, but of becoming complacent and stagnant. An environment of change and even uncertainty can energize a mentally strong person and bring out their best.

4. Waste Energy on Things They Can’t Control. Mentally strong people don’t complain (much) about bad traffic, lost luggage, or especially aboutother people, as they recognize that all of these factors are generally beyond their control. In a bad situation, they recognize that the one thing they can always control is their own response and attitude, and they use these attributes well.

5. Worry About Pleasing Others. Know any people pleasers? Or, conversely, people who go out of their way to dis-please others as a way of reinforcing an image of strength? Neither position is a good one. A mentally strong person strives to be kind and fair and to please others where appropriate, but is unafraid to speak up. They are able to withstand the possibility that someone will get upset and will navigate the situation, wherever possible, with grace.  It takes much practice to hone mental strength

6. Fear Taking Calculated Risks. A mentally strong person is willing to take calculated risks. This is a different thing entirely than jumping headlong into foolish risks. But with mental strength, an individual can weigh the risks and benefits thoroughly, and will fully assess the potential downsides and even the worst-case scenarios before they take action.

7. Dwell on the Past. There is strength in acknowledging the past and especially in acknowledging the things learned from past experiences—but a mentally strong person is able to avoid miring their mental energy in past disappointments or in fantasies of the “glory days” gone by. They invest the majority of their energy in creating an optimal present and future.

8. Make the Same Mistakes Over and Over. We all know the definition of insanity, right? It’s when we take the same actions again and again while hoping for a different and better outcome than we’ve gotten before. A mentally strong person accepts full responsibility for past behavior and is willing to learn from mistakes. Research shows that the ability to be self-reflective in an accurate and productive way is one of the greatest strengths of spectacularly successful executives and entrepreneurs.

9. Resent Other People’s Success. It takes strength of character to feel genuine joy and excitement for other people’s success. Mentally strong people have this ability. They don’t become jealous or resentful when others succeed (although they may take close notes on what the individual did well). They are willing to work hard for their own chances at success, without relying on shortcuts.

10. Give Up After Failure. Every failure is a chance to improve. Even the greatest entrepreneurs are willing to admit that their early efforts invariably brought many failures. Mentally strong people are willing to fail again and again, if necessary, as long as the learning experience from every “failure” can bring them closer to their ultimate goals.

11. Fear Alone Time. Mentally strong people enjoy and even treasure the time they spend alone. They use their downtime to reflect, to plan, and to be productive. Most importantly, they don’t depend on others to shore up their happiness and moods. They can be happy with others, and they can also be happy alone.

12. Feel the World Owes Them Anything. Particularly in the current economy, executives and employees at every level are gaining the realization that the world does not owe them a salary, a benefits package and a comfortable life, regardless of their preparation and schooling. Mentally strong people enter the world prepared to work and succeed on their merits, at every stage of the game.

13. Expect Immediate Results. Whether it’s a workout plan, a nutritional regimen, or starting a business, mentally strong people are “in it for the long haul”. They know better than to expect immediate results. They apply their energy and time in measured doses and they celebrate each milestone and increment of success on the way. They have “staying power.” And they understand that genuine changes take time. Do you have mental strength? Are there elements on this list you need more of? With thanks to Amy Morin, I would like to reinforce my own abilities further in each of these areas today. How about you?

Improving Self-Esteem and Self-Confidence, Part 2

by Jennifer Menichello, LPC at Strategies for Success in Chandler, AZ

self esteem road sign illustration design

Last month, I suggested some things you can try on your own or with the help of your therapist to help you feel better about yourself.  Here are some more tips to increase your self-esteem/self-confidence:

– Take an inventory of all of the positive things you have accomplished throughout your life; things you are especially proud of.  At the end of each day, add something positive you have done that day to your list, and review it often.

– Think of a few specific goals….things you would like to accomplish in the future (near or far).  Close your eyes and visualize yourself successfully meeting these goals.

– Learn to recognize your negative thoughts.  Remember that you aren’t a fool…..you may have just done something foolish! Recognize and fix your mistakes when you can, but don’t internalize them.

– Avoid all-or-nothing thinking, such as “I always screw up!” or, “I’m never on time!”  Maybe you got to work on time 4 out of 5 days, and were only late once.  Try to think of times where you have shown up on time.  No one does something wrong 100% of the time.

– Try to keep your sense of humor!

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