Strategies for Success Counseling and Wellness Center is on the Move!!!

We are very pleased to be able to continue to be a premier resource to the South East Valley Community for Counseling and Wellness services.  Our new location is a Wellness Center and will eventually offer all types of wellness services, including: Massage Therapy, Hair Services, Retreats, Acupuncture, Chiropractor Services and Physical Therapy in the near future.  Currently we provide individual, couple and family counseling, Small Business Employee Relations Consulting, EAP Counseling, Life Coaching, Seminars, and Department of Transportation/SAP services.

We are pleased to be able to offer most of these services at convenient times, as well as online.  All visits are by appointment only, however you can always ask for soonest available as new appointments pop-up all the time, often the same day.

We are so excited to announce that our Strategies for Success Counseling and Wellness Center Office has moved to the Sun Lakes Health Center located on the corner of Alma School and Riggs Road, at 10440 E. Riggs Road, Chandler AZ 85248, just 1 mile South of the current location. 

We look forward to seeing you very soon!

 

 

New Counselor Starts in March

Curriculum vitaeStrategies for Success is excited to welcome Regina Robison to the practice starting March 23, 2015. Regina’s strengths as a clinician include being compassionate, non-judgmental, and utilizes a strengths-based approach to care. She believes it is important to look at each individual as a whole, taking into account each person’s spiritual, cultural, and environmental influences to assist clients in overcoming problems and achieve balance and happiness in their lives. Regina also believes that it is essential for people to work through past trauma in order to release residual blame and shame and break free of old patterns that can keep them stuck in maladaptive thinking and behavioral patterns in their current life stage.

Regina’s clinical experience includes over 10 years working with children, adolescents, adults, elderly and clients with disabilities. She also has experience working with individuals and couples, providing treatment for mental health issues and substance abuse concerns as well as with conduct disorder, depression, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder, grief and loss, and relationship conflicts, to name a few. Regina has also led multiple groups on topics that include self-esteem building, anger management, social skill building, substance abuse and conflict resolution, and is excited about the possibility of leading some groups at Strategies for Success.  She has worked from a Multisystemic approach successfully,  with seriously delinquent adolescents, and is very well versed with adolescent and family concerns.
In 2008, Regina received her Master of Arts Degree in Professional Counseling from Ottawa University in Phoenix, and her Bachelors of Arts in Psychology from Arizona State University in 2004, Magna Cum Laude.  She currently holds independent Licensure with the Arizona Board of Behavioral Health, as a Licensed Professional Counselor.
Regina utilizes various therapeutic approaches to assist clients in achieving their goals including cognitive behavioral therapy, brief solution-focused therapy, existential therapy, insight-oriented modalities and narrative therapy. Regina is a firm believer  in the healing power of the client-therapist relationship. Each treatment plan is created and implemented collaboratively with each client, tailored to maximize positive outcomes and lasting results. To email Regina, please do so at regina.robison@saptherapist.com. To schedule with Regina starting at the end of March in our Chandler location, please call our Main Number: (480) 252-5152 or email us at appointment@saptherapist.com.

50 Best Back-to-School Articles for Parents

Back to schoolby 

Article from www.rootsofaction.com

In addition to getting your student ready, back-to-school is also a time when most parents revisit strategies that help support their children during the academic year.

What’s your parenting mindset at back-to-school time, or anytime?

As a writer and researcher with a passion for positive youth development, I regularly connect with educators and psychologists who write superb articles for parents.

These authors share the latest thinking and research on learning, achievement, family well-being, parent engagement, special needs children, youth sports, media, technology, discipline, homework, bullying, and much more.

As your children get back-to-school and resettled into their routines, take some time for yourself – to reflect on your own values about education and how you can more intentionally support your children.  I’ve compiled what I believe are some of the best back-to-school articles for parents – from a variety of reputable bloggers. The list is divided by topic and I’ve put a short summary of what you will find in each one.

Read what piques your interest now and bookmark others for later.  And if you like particular authors, be sure to follow their articles throughout the school year by signing up for their RSS feeds or email subscriptions.  If you use social media, I’ve included links to their Twitter accounts and Facebook Pages to make following easy.

I guarantee you’ll find some meaningful food for thought here – whether it’s back-to-school time or anytime! And you’ll also meet some great people who support children’s positive growth and well-being. Happy reading!

Learning & Achievement

1. Teaching Beyond The Transmission of Knowledgeby Miguel Angel Escotet, Ph.D.  Parents are teachers too! Understand the educational philosophy of teaching to the test vs. teaching to the heart. Twitter

2. The Developmental Psychologists’ Back-to-School Shopping List by Gabrielle Principe, Ph.D. atPsychology Today. Five ways to improve children’s learning at all ages, grounded in scientific research.

3. Kindergarten Academics: What To Expect by Patti Ghezzi at SchoolFamily. Learn how kindergarten has changed and how new academic standards will affect your child. Twitter; Facebook Page

4. A Link Between Relatedness and Academic Achievement by Ugo Uche, LPC, at Psychology Today. The key to student success relies not just with teacher’s attitudes toward students but also with the student’s attitude towards the teacher. Parents help develop these attitudes! Twitter

5. Happiness in the Classroom by Jessica Lahey.  A middle-school teacher’s tips for classroom happiness apply beautifully to parents too! Pass this one onto your child’s teacher! Twitter

6. Seven Ways to Encourage Reluctant Readers by Steve Reifman, M.Ed.  A teacher’s strategies can turn your child from a reluctant to a willing reader. Try them out! TwitterFacebook Page

7. Boys and Girls Learn Differently by Patti Ghezzi at SchoolFamily. Get insights on how to help your son or daughter at home and in the classroom. Twitter; Facebook Page

8. The Success Myth by Heidi Grant Halvorson, Ph.D., at Psychology Today. Rethink your ideas of what makes us succeed. Then apply them to your parenting. Twitter

Family Well-Being

9. It Isn’t Easy Being a Parent by the Search Institute. Nine strategies every parent should know based on fostering developmental assets in children. Twitter;Facebook Page

10. The Happy Teen: A Primer on the Positives in Youth Development by Stephen Gray Wallace, M.S.Ed. at Psychology Today. Read some good news about adolescent development.

11. Growing Empathy by Jody McVittie, M.D. atSoundDiscipline. How to see the world through children’s eyes, without judgement. Twitter;Facebook Page

12. Resisting Raising Children Who Feel Entitled by Jan Faull, M.Ed. at ParentNet Unplugged. How NOT to indulge your child’s every want. TwitterFacebook Page

13. Four Tips for Having a Happier Family, by Joe Wilner at PsychCentral. How to deepen family bonds. TwitterFacebook Page

14. The Seven Best Gratitude Quotes by Melanie A. Greenberg, Ph.D., at Psychology Today. How to bring gratitude into your family’s life. TwitterFacebook Page

15. Are Parents Setting Kids Up for Failure by Pushing Too Hard for Success? By Lylah M. Alphonse at Yahoo Shine. Tips from Madeline Levine’s new book, “Teach Your Children Well: Parenting for Authentic Success.” Twitter; Facebook Page

16. Five Lessons Our Kids Don’t Learn in School For Success in Life by Jennifer Owens at HuffPost Parents. Parents play a big role in teaching children how to succeed in life! Learn how. Twitter

17. Six Ways to Let Your Child’s Genius Out by Marjie Knudsen at The Oregonian. Learn how to support your child’s learning – for a lifetime! Twitter

18. Healthy Parenting after the Marriage Ends by Kevin D. Arnold, Ph.D., at Psychology Today.  How to support your children’s social, emotional and intellectual health after divorce. Twitter

 

Read more here: http://www.rootsofaction.com/50-best-back-to-school-articles-for-parents/

How to find the BEST Therapist for you

Man talking to his psychiatrist

Seven tips on finding the best therapist for you.

Published on February 15, 2011 by Tracey Cleantis, LMFT in Freudian Sip
Article from:
The first time I went to therapy, my parents chose a psychotherapist quickly (an easier decision than which mechanic they took their car to). The way they found this nutter-butter-can-of-cashews was that my first pediatrician didn’t know what to do for my nightly all-night/every night nightmares and so he sent me to a therapist. He thought she was good because of her seemingly impressive pedigree, and let me let them tell you as they told everyone who asked, “She did therapy on the Prime Minister from Israel.” Even at ten I found this bit of information troubling and logistically dubious, as we lived in a beachside suburb in Los Angeles and the Prime Minister from Israel lived in Israel.

Here are a few examples of her wacky behavior:

1. She ate cottage cheese with her mouth open during our sessions. I feel sure that her mouth full of curds gave me more nightmares rather than less.

2. She read her mail during our sessions. While I get that my 10-year-old chatter was not very stimulating, she was getting paid to listen to me and not to read what the latest edition of Readers Digest said about how to declutter your desk. Good God, do I wish I was making this stuff up.

3. I have since learned that she asked patients for rides to the airport. She never asked me for a ride, but I was only ten and I didn’t even have a bike.

I thought, as a public service of sorts, and since I am a therapist and since I write about being in therapy, it might be a good thing if I shared some thoughts about picking a therapist—should you ever find yourself in need of one—as they can be harder to find than a good mechanic.

1. Ask friends and family

Ask friends who are in therapy if they like their therapist. If they do, find out what it is they like about them and ask your friend to ask her therapist for a list of referrals. I have never gotten a good referral that way but I have given out some good referrals because friends have asked me if my therapist knew anyone for them.

If none of your friends are in therapy or if they tell you that they don’t like their therapist and how they keep going just because they don’t want to hurt the therapist’s feelings, it is best to get a referral elsewhere. I have gotten my most of my referrals by calling institutes (Jungian/Psychodynamic/Psychoanalytic) to find out what therapists were in my area. That said, you don’t want a therapist who is convenient—you want a therapist who is good. Good and convenient do not often go hand in hand. I could have a therapist that is only five minutes from my house but I believe Igor is worth the hour drive. And, I find the 60-minute drive home to be an important time to process my feelings.

Many institutes have a service in which a clinic director will do an intake and determine what therapist in the community might be a good fit for you. That is a wonderful way to find a therapist if you don’t have a referral source.

2. Shop online

While I have never found a therapist online, I do have an ad on Therapist Finder. And I do think (in the Match.com age) it is likely the way that most will first meet their therapist is on Psychology Today’s Therapy Finder. When therapist shopping I would look for therapists who are not selling themselves but rather seem to be trying to tell you about their work and their philosophy of working with patients.

3. A picture tells a story

Take a look at therapists’ pictures on Psychology Today’s Therapist Finder. Red lights for me are therapists who seem to be using a glamour shot or whose portraits seem in any way seductive. I would also steer clear of therapists who chose for their professional portrait shots of them partaking in their favorite hobby or recreational activity. If you have any doubt based on photos, I would listen to that and maybe see if you can find someone who you could easily sit across from. I am not saying your therapist needs to look like a supermodel—just if when you look at them and you feel any concern or apprehension, I would heed that intuition.

4. Gender

I think that when choosing a therapist, almost all people have an instinctive hit on gender they would prefer to work with. For me, my default therapist choice is always male which, in fact, comes out of my relationship with my parents. I don’t think there is a right or wrong when it comes to choosing which gender you prefer to work with. However, I think it can be clinically valuable to notice which gender you absolutely wouldn’t want to work with. I would make note of that and let my therapist know about my strong feelings of “no way” when considering a certain gender for a therapist.

Copyright 2016 by OutLoud Marketing Studio for Strategies for Success